Nigeria in our classroom

Nigerian culture in our classroom...

We are Alisa and Lena and currently we are visiting  one of the English senior courses in grade thirteen. In summer we are going to take our A-Levels.

Our most recent topic was Nigeria and after we had talked a lot about it in class our teacher Mrs. Laufer-Joußen organised a meeting with Mr. Jeremiah who was born and raised in Nigeria.

He told us about the ethnic groups, the religion, the growing division or gap between rich and poor and the terrorist attacks. Furthermore, he showed us some traditional food and the traditional clothing from Nigeria.

He for example explained that the three main ethnic groups in Nigeria are Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo. The majority of the residents are Christians and Muslims, the minority has no religion and some residents combine indigenous beliefs and practices with Christanity or Islam.

Mr. Jeremiah also told our course that many people in Nigeria are rich because of the fossil oil, which was found in Nigeria and  which is exported to many western countries. However, the redistribution is not working properly, so the rich ones get richer while the poor ones get poorer and can not even afford a croissant in a day.

Moreover, education in Nigeria is a huge problem since the Islamic terrorist groups such as Boko Haram occupied the country. Their name means ”books are bad“ or ”education is bad“ and they are against western education. Since their occupation  of many regions in 2012 they  have destroyed many schools, burned books and kidnapped many girls for the reason of forced marriage or to sell them as slaves.

Nigeria in our classroom 12-2020 - Vera Laufer-JoußenWhen Mr. Jeremiah came to visit our course we were also part of his presentation. He showed us a traditional colourful robe and a hat, which the people in Nigeria wear to church. Mr. Jeremiah told us a lot about the clothing because in Germany he works as a pastor. One of our coursemates was allowed to try on the robe too.

It was also very interesting that Mr. Jeremiah showed us the typical food such as okra, which he likes to buy in African shops. We asked him if he missed any food from Nigeria, but he explained that the African shops offer everything he likes.

Finally, we would like to thank Mr. Jeremiah for visiting both our A-Level courses despite the corona pandemic. It was really interesting to learn more about his culture and to get to know his point of view on certain topics we had thematised in our course.

 

Text: Lena Baccus and Alisa Ilkbahar, grade 13, senior course English at GHS Mülheim
Foto: V. Laufer-Joußen

December 2020



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